Media Reports

The New Paper
13 November 2012

A young man was charged with taking upskirt videos and Mr Chung Ting Fai, who represented him, mitigated on his behalf pleading that the Defendant’s actions were a result of him suffering from sexual fetishism.
Lianhe Zaobao
1 October 2012

“Chung Ting Fai & Co.” was listed as one of the companies involved with the China Enterprises Association (Singapore).
Chongqing Chenbao
9 September 2012

Mr Chung Ting Fai was invited to give advice to entrepreneurs in Chongqing who were interested in expanding their businesses to countries overseas, including Singapore.
Lianhe Zaobao
6 August 2012

In his column ‘Legal Matters’, Mr Chung Ting Fai mentioned that it was a common assumption of many that the law from their home country would be applicable to Singapore and that this was a wrong assumption to be held.
Chongqing Wanbao
27 June 2012

Mr Chung Ting Fai as the treasurer of the Singapore China Friendship Association, gave a speech addressed to Chinese national parents, with regards to the issues of sending their children to Singapore for educational purposes.
Lianhe Zaobao
18 June 2012

Mr Chung Ting Fai was invited to express his legal opinion regarding the distinction drawn between Art and Vandalism in Singapore. Mr Chung Ting Fai expressed that each country’s legislation would differ from one another and these legislations should be enforced.
My Paper
6 June 2012

Mr Chung Ting Fai was invited to express his legal opinion regarding the methods used for debt collection in Singapore. Mr Chung Ting Fai explained the differences between harassment and the act of threatening, and how its classification would depend on the situation.
Lianhe Zaobao
28 May 2012

Mr Chung Ting Fai, who pens a column in the papers, will be publishing his 2nd edition of ‘Legal Affairs’ on 29 May 2012. It consists a selection of his writings from his column, enabling readers, especially those who have just moved to Singapore, to learn more about the law in Singapore.
Lianhe Zaobao
16 January 2012

With regards to the case where a Chinese national woman was charged with overstaying in Singapore for 436 days and corruption for bribing a police officer, Mr Chung Ting Fai, the lawyer for the Defendant, cautioned the public in his column “Legal Affairs” that pleading with law enforcement officials in an inappropriate manner upon their sudden arrest could possibly result in charges for corruption.
Lianhe Zaobao
16 January 2012

The Kowloon Club hosted a friendly football competition on 8 January whereby 8 teams competed against each another.
The Straits Times
13 January 2012

A Chinese national woman was charged with overstaying in Singapore for 436 days and corruption for offering a police officer sexual favours. The Defendant’s lawyer, Chung Ting Fai, mitigated on her behalf pleading that her fear of a long sentence in a foreign country was what led to her actions.
Lianhe Wanbao
12 January 2012

A Chinese national woman was charged with overstaying in Singapore for 436 days and corruption for offering a police officer sexual favours. The Defendant’s lawyer, Chung Ting Fai, mitigated on her behalf pleading that her fear of a long sentence in a foreign country was what led to her actions.
Lianhe Wanbao
9 January 2012

Law Q&A – A man believes that his father is currently being charged for the same matter that he had already served a jail term for. His query was why the CID and CPIB did not effect charges with regards to the same matter at the same time. Mr Chung Ting Fai’s reply was that a crime committed could result in an investigation being conducted in different law enforcement agencies. He could however seek professional legal advice to find out if his father was being charged over the same issue.
Lianhe Wanbao
8 January 2012

Law Q&A – A man was involved in a car accident when he was driving his lorry and he received just $150 as compensation when he brought his lorry to the depot, although he was promised a compensation of $1900. He asked if there was any way of recourse and Mr Chung Ting Fai replied that he had the right to be informed of the details of the compensation and he could request for more information from the lawyers involved.
Lianhe Wanbao
1 January 2012

Law Q&A - A lady enquired if an SMS was sufficient proof for a debt of $200 which was sent by a friend whom she lent the sum to. Mr Chung Ting Fai’s reply was that there were two points which she should take into consideration. Firstly, if the SMS's content contained sufficient details of proof that the said sum was lent and secondly, if the sum to be recovered was worth the potential legal fees.